RSS   RSS 2.0   ATOM XML Sign up for our monthly newsletter:

198 posts categorized "Architecture"



April 15, 2014

On the market: A house fit for The King.

ElvisHouseForSale1

Kudos to Dave Weinstein of the Eichler Network for letting us know about the Elvis Honeymoon Hideaway hitting the market in Palm Springs, Calif. Designed in 1960 by Bill Krisel, the house was rented for a year by Elvis Presley, who celebrated his honeymoon there with Priscilla in 1967. Now used as an informal museum to The King, the circular rooms are outfitted with cardboard cutouts and mannequins (whether or not they are included in the sale is unclear). Listed for $9.5 million, the 5,000-square-foot home consists of four perfect circles on three levels, and features a pool, tennis court, orchard and, naturally, a stage. It is listed with Josh Altman, who stars on the Bravo show Million Dollar Listing.

ElvisHouseForSale4

ElvisHouseForSale5

April 04, 2014

Remembering Lucia Eames.

Screen shot 2014-04-04 at 11.37.12 AM
Image courtesy of Eames Office.

It is with great sadness that we learned of the passing of Lucia Eames on April 1, 2014. The founder of the Eames Foundation, Lucia was the beloved daughter and stepdaughter of Charles and Ray Eames. She was an artist, graphic designer, owner of the Eames Office and mother of five.

EamesHouse_GwendolynHorton
Eames House, also known as Case Study House #8. Photo by Gwendolyn Horton.

It is because of Lucia's foresight and passion for the Eames legacy that the Eames House – one of the most important works of residential architecture from the 20th century – is a National Historic Landmark and will continue to be conserved, studied and enjoyed for years to come.

MetropolisCoverLuciaEames
Read Lucia Eames interview by Paul Makovsky for Metropolis.

Our thoughts are with the Eames family at this time. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in her name to the Eames Foundation for the preservation of the Eames House.

April 01, 2014

Last Biennial for Marcel Breuer’s Whitney Museum.

640px-Whitney_Museum_of_American_Art

A swan song of sorts is playing at the Whitney Museum of American Art: the last Biennial exhibition before the museum moves downtown and leaves behind the landmark building designed by Marcel Breuer in the 1960s.

The momentousness of that move is not lost on the museum staff, who asked the three guest curators of the Biennial how the Breuer building figured in their thoughts as the show was coming together. Each curator was assigned a floor, second through fourth, and 103 artists or art groups are represented in all, double the number of the 2012 Biennial.

Continue reading "Last Biennial for Marcel Breuer’s Whitney Museum." »

March 24, 2014

Shigeru Ban named 2014 Pritzker Prize Laureate.

Shigeru-Ban-Portrait_0
Photo courtesy of Shigeru Ban Architects.

Japanese architect Shigeru Ban has been awarded the 2014 Pritzker Architecture Prize, the industry's highest honor. "He is an outstanding architect who, for twenty years, has been responding with creativity and high quality design to extreme situations caused by devastating natural disasters," cites the Pritzker Jury. "His creative approach and innovation, especially related to building materials and structures, not merely good intentions, are present in all his works."

Shigeru-Ban-Cardboard-Cathedral-02
Cardboard Cathedral, 2013, Christchurch, New Zealand. Photo by Stephen Goodenough.

Shigeru-Ban-Naked-House-02
Naked House, 2000, Saitama, Japan. Photo by Hiroyuki Hirai.

Continue reading "Shigeru Ban named 2014 Pritzker Prize Laureate. " »

March 10, 2014

Architizer A+ Awards Finalist.

OilHarbourBridge
Oil Harbour Bridge in Raunheim, Germany by schneider+schumacher. Photo by Jörg Hempel.

"The curlicue design of the Oil Harbour Bridge does more than create a spiral over a river in Raunheim," writes James Bartolacci, "it also prevents pedestrian access to the nearby oil depot and tankers, which house and transport highly flammable substances."

One of six finalists in the Architizer A+ Awards, you can vote for the Oil Harbour Bridge or one of the other sinuous bridges and pathways celebrated at architizer.com.

February 27, 2014

Saarinen's TWA Terminal is back on standby.

IMG_0604
Photo by Gwendolyn Horton.

In early 2011, the Port Authority of New York issued a request for proposals to transform the Eero Saarinen-designed TWA Terminal at JFK Airport into the centerpiece of a hotel. A few big players – including Trump and Starwood – sent representatives to tour the vacant terminal, and until recently it looked like developer André Balazs was going to develop the site, using the historic landmark as the lobby for a 150-room hotel. In January, André Balazs Properties issued a statement that said, "After more than two years of negotiations, Standard International has been unable to reach a final agreement with the Port Authority and will no longer pursue the project."

IMG_0236
Photo by Gwendolyn Horton.

Completed in 1962, the TWA Terminal has been vacant since American acquired TWA in 2001. It was added to America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places list in 2003.

Continue reading "Saarinen's TWA Terminal is back on standby." »

Architectural Digest celebrates DWR in NYC.

DWR_NYC
The Apartment at our new Studio. Photo by Michael Biondo.

DWR "is shaking things up at its newest store," writes Asad Syrkett in his review of our new Studio at East 57th & 3rd. "The centerpiece — a glass-enclosed cantilevered duplex 'apartment' — which was crafted to give visitors an idea of how items from disparate DWR collections could cohabit, marks a departure from sales floors at the firm’s other locations."

Learn more about our new space at architecturaldigest.com, or stop by the Studio to see it for yourself. We look forward to seeing you.

February 24, 2014

Beadle-built and beloved in Arizona.

Albeadle-lo
Al Beadle. Photo by JJ Brinkman.

“If visual pollution were toxic, we’d all be dead,” said architect Alfred Newman Beadle (1927–1998). A curmudgeon and perfectionist, the always-dressed-in-black Beadle also had a romantic side, believing that “every house should have a surprise for its owners.”

IMG_1573
Beadle House No. 6 (1954), aka White Gates. Photo by Gwendolyn Horton.

IMG_1597
Beadle House (1958), located around the corner from House No. 6. Photo by Gwendolyn Horton.

Recognized today as one of Arizona’s best architects, Beadle began his career as a builder in 1950. He never attended architecture school and never intended on being anything more than a builder. Fortunately, for those who live in and love his houses, he started designing.

Continue reading "Beadle-built and beloved in Arizona. " »

February 20, 2014

Our architect's home.

KorayDumanAtHome
Koray Duman on custom sofa. Around Table from DWR. Photo by Anne Wermiel.

Koray Duman spends a lot of time in DWR Studios, being that he and fellow architect Laith Sayigh designed our new spaces in Stamford, Costa Mesa, Miami, SoHo, San Francisco, West Hollywood and the soon-to-be-open (in a few hours) 57th & 3rd Studio in New York.

When Duman is not at DWR, he relaxes in his Manhattan home, featured in today's New York Post.

Koraydomanfeature1
Photo by Anne Wermiel.

January 24, 2014

Built for peace and quiet.

Serbiariverhouse
Photo by Irene Becker, it was the 8.2.12 Photo of the Day at National Geographic.

Kudos to Spencer Peterson at Curbed and Katie Hosmer at My Modern Met for sharing this river house with us. Built on the Drina River in Serbia, the house was originally built in 1968, and has been rebuilt six times since then after being lost to storms and floods.

December 27, 2013

On location: Where is gwendoland?

Photo 1-8

Photo 2-6

Photo 3-7

Continue reading "On location: Where is gwendoland?" »

Life takes a U-turn into Usonia.

Usonia1
Reisley House, 1952, by Frank Lloyd Wright. Photo: Roland Reisley

Imagine driving through a neighborhood of midcentury modern homes, admiring the work of Frank Lloyd Wright, Aaron Resnick, David Henken and others. You playfully say to your mate, “That’s my favorite. That’s the one I would want,” before finding out that it’s for sale. A few months later, you’re living in it. That’s how one modern-day couple – an architect and a designer – came to live in Usonia, a very special community of 47 homes in Westchester County, New York.

Usonia3
Benjamin Henken House, 1949, by David Henken. Photo: Roland Reisley

“It was like discovering a midcentury Brigadoon,” says one, referring to Alan Jay Lerner’s story about a mysterious village that appears for only one day every hundred years. Fortunately, Usonia has stood on the same spot for 65 years, and the people who love it are going to make sure that it never disappears. “You can feel the sense of community,” she continues. “It’s woven into the landscape.”

IMG_2077a
Kahn House, 1962, by Aaron Resnick. Photo: Gwendolyn Horton

David Henken, an apprentice of Frank Lloyd Wright, initiated the idea for this cooperative housing community in 1943. A year later, he and his wife Priscilla had 13 families interested in being part of “the Usonian dream,” which they described as: creating a more fulfilling community life than they’d known previously, being part of a community of caring neighbors and living in harmony with one’s surroundings.

Continue reading "Life takes a U-turn into Usonia." »

Craving culture? Exhibitions to see now.

TheCapePhoenix
Pauline Trigere, French (1909 – 2002). Cape and Dress, 1971. Gift of Bobbie Haas

From fashion in Phoenix to seeing the future in New York to time machines at MIT, there is richness to enjoy everywhere. Here are the must-see exhibitions happening around the country.

ARIZONA

Phoenix Art Museum
The Cape

MASSACHUSETTS

Peabody Essex Museum
Toshio Shibata, Constructed Landsapes

MIT Museum
Stanley Greenberg: Time Machines

ILLINOIS

Chicago History Museum
Inspiring Beauty: 50 Years of Ebony Fashion Fair - Through Jan. 5

Art Institute of Chicago
Art and Appetite: American Painting, Culture, and Cuisine

McCloskey-Wrapped-Oranges_480
William J. McCloskey. Wrapped Oranges, 1889. Amon Carter Museum of American Art, Fort Worth, Texas, Acquisition in memory of Katrine Deakins, Trustee, Amon Carter Museum of American Art, 1961–1985.

Continue reading "Craving culture? Exhibitions to see now." »

December 26, 2013

Palm Springs Premiere: "Nobody Famous Ever Lived Here."

NobodyFamousFilm

Tickets are now available to the Palm Springs premiere of this film about Case Study House No. 22, aka the Stahl House, designed by Pierre Koenig. Built in 1960, this extraordinarily minimal house demonstrated how industrial materials could be used to create an affordable, inviting home (the stunning Hollywood Hills setting didn’t hurt). Today it’s one of the most famous private homes in the world. The film includes never-before-published photographs and home movies from the Stahl archives.

Palm Springs Premiere: February 15 at the Hilton Hotel. Following the screening, there will be a panel discussion with the director of the film, Steven Slomkowski.

StahlHouse

Sweetest gingerbread house, er, museum.

GuggenheimGingerbread

The folks at Architizer were treated to impressive examples of architectural, engineering and baking skills as they reviewed the entries for their second annual Gingerbread Competition. The winner was the Aarhus Group's interpretation of the Guggenheim Museum, complete with sugar-spun "glass" roof. Frank Lloyd Wright would be very pleased. Click here to see the top 10 entries.

GuggenheimGingerbread2

 

December 06, 2013

DWR West Hollywood now open!

Image-7
Eames Lounge Chair and Grasshopper Lamp greeting customers to our new space.

The DWR Studio at 8612 Melrose Ave. in West Hollywood occupies a new building with a two-story glass façade that invites a look inside. Unique features include a large Light Cloud of pendant fixtures, the Design Library Swatch Wall and 25 full-room vignettes.

Image-8

The new Studio is right at home in the neighborhood, which lies within the West Hollywood Design District and La Cienega Design Quarter, two areas dedicated to art, fashion, dining and design. Stop by for a tour of our beautiful new space. We look forward to seeing you.

Image-10

November 26, 2013

Giving thanks for Paolo Soleri.

IMG_0478
Barrel vaults used as an office and workshop at Cosanti. Photo: Gwendolyn Horton

If there were an official sound to Arizona, it would be the chime of Paolo Soleri’s wind-bells. Although this fascinating man left our world in April 2013, his voice has not been silenced. His bells – like doorbells that announce your arrival to another way of living – serve as reminders of what is possible when we approach our world with kindness and a sense of community.

IMG_0469
Wind-bells in front of earth-cast Cosanti structure. Photo: Gwendolyn Horton

Born in Turin, Italy, in 1919, Paolo Soleri was an architect, writer, thinker, philosopher, artist and visionary. When he was in his twenties, he spent a year as an apprentice for Frank Lloyd Wright at Taliesin West, returned to Italy for several years, then made his way back to the U.S. and settled in Arizona. In 1955, Soleri purchased a five-acre property in Paradise Valley, which he named Cosanti, a combination of the Italian words cose and anti. Together the words mean “before things,” expressing one of his hopes for humankind’s role in this world.

IMG_0488
Ceramics Studio (1958) at Cosanti. Photo: Gwendolyn Horton

Cosanti and the experimental town Arcosanti, which he founded in 1970, are human habitats that Soleri created to explore alternative methods of architecture and ways of group living. While Arcosanti is the stronger expression of his concept of arcology, which asserts that architecture and ecology are one integral process, many believe that Cosanti is his greatest work.

Continue reading "Giving thanks for Paolo Soleri." »

Craving culture? Exhibitions to see now.

Christenberry
At the J. Paul Getty Museum: Red Building in Forest, Hale County, Alabama, ©William Christenberry 

Here are just a few exhibitions happening around the country. From stage designs at Yale to Edward Hopper in Manhattan and Dallas to time machines at MIT, there is richness to enjoy everywhere.

NEW YORK

MoMA
Designing Modern Women 1890–1990
American Modern: Hopper to O'Keeffe

Museum of the City of New York
Norman Bel Geddes: I Have Seen the Future

Brooklyn Museum
Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk

TEXAS

Dallas Museum of Art
Hopper Drawing: A Painter's Process

HopperMoma
Edward Hopper. House by the Railroad. 1925. Oil on canvas, 24 x 29" (61 x 73.7 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York, Digital Imaging Studio

Continue reading "Craving culture? Exhibitions to see now." »

October 16, 2013

Help save the Weidlinger House.

 

Due to a lack of resources from the Park Service, this irreplaceable piece of our cultural heritage ended up abandoned and slated for demolition in the pristine landscape of the Cape Cod National Seashore. The Cape Cod Modern House Trust (CCMHT) has initiated a Kickstarter campaign to raise at least $50,000 toward the structure’s restoration and conversion into an artist/scholar residence by July 2014.

WeidlingerHouse
The living room in it’s original state. Photo: Madeliene Weidlinger-Friedli

In 1952, Paul Weidlinger bought this secluded parcel of land in Wellfleet. Inspired by his friend, the famed architect Marcel Breuer, who had settled just across the pond, he set out to combine his vision of experimental modernism with the particular requirements of a Cape Cod summerhouse.

Continue reading "Help save the Weidlinger House." »

October 03, 2013

French architecture, peacocks, gardens ... and chairs.

GwendolynHortonClosLuce
Photo: Gwendolyn Horton

Chateau du Clos Luce in Amboise, France. This is where Leonardo da Vinci lived from 1516 to 1519.

GwendolynHortonAmboise
Photo: Gwendolyn Horton

Landscaped gardens at Amboise Chateau Royal.

GwendolynHortonDeGaulleAirport
Photo: Gwendolyn Horton

Charles de Gaulle Airport Terminal 2E designed by Paul Andreu.

Continue reading "French architecture, peacocks, gardens ... and chairs." »